Topaz Jones

Topaz Jones

Topaz Jones

January 15–March 8, 2020

Dreamscapes. In this series, she fuses her conscious and subconscious with the landscapes of her homelands. Jones has recently illustrated three Native American children’s stories and wrote one Shoshone story for publication. In the years to come, Jones would like to publish more children’s books and begin writing art-themed publications. She plans to begin research on Contemporary Great Basin beadwork and basket making. Jones currently lives and works in Santa Fe, New Mexico with her family.
Margarita Paz-Pedro

Margarita Paz-Pedro

Margarita Paz-Pedro

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Anna Hoover

Anna Hoover

Anna Hoover

February 20–March 9, 2020

Anna Hoover (Norwegian, Unangax̂) is a writer, artist, and filmmaker. She produces documentary, fiction, and art films from her home state of Alaska. She trained in Printmaking at the University of Washington and participates in print exchanges when the opportunity arises.

Kevin Pourier

Kevin Pourier

Kevin Pourier

March 20–April 29, 2020

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Marlene  Ann Nielsen

Marlene Ann Nielsen

Marlene Ann Nielsen

March 20–April 18, 2020


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Alfred Young Man

Alfred Young Man

Alfred Young Man

April 17–May 15, 2020


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Edwin Neel

Edwin Neel


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Edwin Neel (Kwakwaka’wakw) was Born in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, and has inhabited various cities on Vancouver Island. He currently resides in metro Vancouver, BC. Neel has recently obtained a Bachelor of Fine Arts through the Emily Carr University of Art and Design.


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Tom Jones

Tom Jones

October 7–November 1, 2019

Tom Jones (Ho-Chunk) is an artist, curator, writer, and educator. He is a Professor of Photography at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He received a Master of Fine Arts in Photography and and Master of Arts in Museum Studies from Columbia College.

Jones co-authored the book People of the Big Voice: Photographs of Ho-Chunk Families by Charles Van Schaick, 1879–1943. He is also the co-curator for the exhibition For a Love of His People: the Photography of Horace Poolaw

Cougar Vigil

Cougar Vigil

October 7–November 1, 2019

Cougar Vigil (Jicarilla Apache) is an artist and an enrolled member of the Jicarilla Apache Nation, whose work stems from documentation of his cultural heritage as well as rebellious experimentation with photography. Vigil received his MFA from the Pratt Institute of New York.

Originally trained in modern photography, Vigil breaks away from these modes and employs a more contingent philosophy, by developing contact prints with the sun as an active participant and co-author. Vigil’s narratives emphasize the Indigenous perspective, as well as reactionary awareness toward the colonizer gaze.

Jodi Webster

Jodi Webster

September 3–27, 2019



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River Tikwi Garza

River Tikwi Garza

September 3–17, 2019

River Tikwi Garza (Tongva) is a Los Angeles-based artist that was raised in Gardena, California, a city in the South Bay region of Los Angeles. Garza is of Indigenous and Mexican descent, he is Tongva and is a member of the Ti’at Society.

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Jordan Ann Craig

Jordan Ann Craig

Jordan Ann Craig

March 25, 2019–April 25, 2019

Rico Lanáat’ Worl

Rico Lanáat’ Worl

Rico Lanáat’ Worl

March 25, 2019–April 25, 2019

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Shawn Brigman

Shawn Brigman

Shawn Brigman

Laura Heit-Youngbird

Laura Youngbird

Laura Youngbird

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Monique Sol Sonoquie

Monique Sol Sonoquie

Monique Sol Sonoquie

January 22, 2019–March 14, 2019

Through her California non-profit, The Indigenous Youth Foundation, Inc., and independently, she provides classroom presentations, basketweaving classes, Sacred Site preservation training, answering the calls of Elders and youth in her communities. From sponsoring Native Family Health Days, to authoring children’s books, organizing murals in schools, producing cultural videos, and hosting traditional healers, Sol Sonoquie embodies the tradition of sharing that is so essentially part of our cultures.

As a Basketweaver, she gathers traditional materials such as tule, juncus, hazel, and willow sticks, and more recently with kelp and seaweeds. With limited access to gathering sites and materials due to toxins, land loss ,and climate change, she has found alternative materials to preserve culture and land.

Her new-found challenge and exploration is weaving with recycled materials, combining her passions of traditional weaving and her dedication for “Refuse, Reduce, Reuse and Recycle.” During her residency at 赌博游戏下载, Sol Sonoquie plans to explore and expand on representing traditional lifestyles by reclaiming post industrial waste, evolving from her recently created electronic cables baskets to life size sculptures.

Brent Michael Davids

Brent Michael Davids

Brent Michael Davids

February 1, 2019–February 28, 2019


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He holds Bachelors and Masters degrees in Music Composition from Northern Illinois University (1981) and Arizona State University (1992) respectively, trained at Redford’s Sundance Institute, and apprenticed with Oscar-winning composer Stephen Warbeck (Shakespeare in Love). He has garnered the Distinguished Alumni Awards from both of the universities he attended, NIU (1996) and ASU (2004). In 1983–1984, he was Composer-In-Residence at Graceland College, Iowa.

Many of Davids’ works employ traditional Native American instruments and varied instruments of his own design, including his signature quartz crystal flutes. As an Educator, he founded the award-winning Native American Composer Apprentice Program in Arizona (2000), and the Composer Apprentice National Outreach Endeavor in Minnesota (2005) and in Wisconsin (2015), to teach Indigenous youth to compose their own written music. In 2004, Davids founded the First Nations Composer Initiative as a virtual chapter of the American Composers Forum, serving as its first Artistic Advisor.

Darren Vigil Gray

Darren Vigil Gray

Darren Vigil Gray

February 15–March 15, 2019

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Cara Romero

Cara Romero

Cara Romero

January 17, 2019–February 14, 2019

Diego Romero

Diego Romero

Diego Romero

January 17, 2019–February 14, 2019


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Ric Gendron

Ric Gendron

Ric Gendron

January 17, 2019–February 14, 2019


He currently resides on the Colville Reservation and participates in traditional activities as an elder and student of his environment.

Kenneth Johnson

Kenneth Johnson

Kenneth Johnson

October 30, 2018–December 30, 2018


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Raised in Oklahoma, Johnson is from the Muscogee (Creek) and Seminole tribes, and has received recognition for creating iconic commissions for U.S., Canadian, and Oklahoma Supreme Court Justices, U.S. Congressmen, Native American Tribal Chiefs, museums, and distinguished individuals.

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Adrian Wall

Adrian Wall

Adrian Wall

October 21, 2018–December 15, 2018


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TahNibaa Naataanii

TahNibaa Naataanii

TahNibaa Naataanii

October 30, 2018–December 11, 2018

TahNibaa Naataanii (Navajo) is of the Many Hogan Clan and born for the Coyote Pass Clan. Her maternal and paternal grandfathers are the Mexican Clan and the Steep Rock Clan. She is from Table Mesa and Toadlena, New Mexico.

Naataanii enjoys raising sheep, working with raw and processed wool, enjoys weaving traditional-style Shoulder Blankets, contemporary designs, and exploring the creative process. When she weaves, she feels the wisdom of her Great Matriarchs and “Asdzaa Maaiideeshgiizhnii” who make her a 5th generation weaver.

Melanie Talmadge Sainz

Melanie Talmadge Sainz

Melanie Talmadge Sainz

November 1, 2018–December 13, 2018


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“My art keeps me centered—it is my therapy. I find comfort and peace with my art. While engaged in art making, I often think of my conincaaga (grandmother) Rose Whiterabbit Miner and my naani


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Monty Little

Monty Little

Monty Little

October 3, 2018–November 5, 2018

After five semesters of studying architecture at Arizona State University, Monty Little (Diné) enlisted in the Marine Corps as a Rifleman in 2004. During his enlistment, Little was stationed with 2nd Battalion, 5th Marines and served as a fire team leader while deployed in Iraq for seven months. In 2008, Little was Honorably Discharged from the Marine Corps.

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Luanne Redeye

Luanne Redeye

Luanne Redeye

September 1, 2018–October 31, 2018

Luanne Redeye (Seneca) uses painting as a way to see others. Working primarily in oil she depicts the relationship between perception and experience of native identity through genre scenes, designs, and portraits.

Luanne Redeye’s residency session is made possible by the generous support of Sunrise Springs Spa Resort in partnership with 赌博游戏下载.

Katie Dorame

Katie Dorame

Katie Dorame

September 26, 2018–October 20, 2018

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Challenging Hollywood’s typecasting and depictions of Indigenous actors and other actors of color by recasting, re-working roles and using genres, both film and art historical, to question cinema’s romanticized views of the past that have persisted.

Robert Marcus

Robert Marcus

Robert “Spooner” Marcus

August 20, 2018–October 19, 2018

Robert “Spooner” Marcus (Ohkay Owingeh) is a glass artist. In 1993, just out of high school, his first job was working in a small glass studio in Española making juice cups. This experience as a production glass worker eventually led to his future as a glass artist. After that shop closed, he worked in a wood shop for four years. Then, in 2000, he heard of a glass shop in Taos and decided to dedicate himself to that program. Taos Glass Arts proved to be a turning point in his career. At this shop, he had the opportunity to expand his knowledge and work with other Native American glass artists. Taos Glass Arts closed it’s doors in 2005 and in 2006, he started working at Prairie Dog Glass located at Jackalope in Santa Fe. This is where he currently works producing custom and art glass. Some techniques he uses include blown and sand-carved vessels, sand castings, sculpted figures, and fused glass.

Catherine Thompson

Catherine Thompson

Catherine “Maggie” Thompson

September 1, 2018–September 23, 2018

Thompson had her first solo exhibition, entitled Where I Fit

On Borrowed Time, which explores themes of grief around her experience of losing a parent at the Minnesota Textile Center.

In addition to her fine arts practice, Thompson runs a small knitwear business known as Makwa Studio. She is also an emerging curator of contemporary Native art and has worked on exhibitions at the Two Rivers Gallery, the McKnight Foundation, and the Minnesota Museum of American Art.

Bobby Wilson

Bobby Wilson

Bobby Wilson

September 1, 2018–September 23, 2018

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Lillian Pitt

Lillian Pitt

Lillian Pitt

September 17, 2018–September 28, 2018

Lillian Pitt (Wasco/Warm Springs/Yakama) was born on the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Wasco and Paiute Reservation in 1943. She is known internationally for her masks of clay, bronze, and cast glass, along with her sculpture, jewelry, and prints—which honor her ancestors from the Columbia River Gorge.

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Janet Rogers

Janet Rogers

Janet Rogers

 Splitting the Heart, Ekstasis Editions 2007, Red Erotic Between Spirit and Emotion, Bookland Press, Fall 2018. She produced and hosted Native Waves Radio on CFUV-FM from 2007–2017. Her music column, Tribal Clefs, was part of CBC Victoria’s programming from 2008–2016. Her radio documentaries, Bring Your Drum: 50 years of Indigenous Protest Music and Resonating Reconciliation, won Best Radio at the imagineNATIVE Film and Media Festival in 2011 and 2013.

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For This Land presented as multi-channel media installations in several galleries and public venues. Rogers also produced a six-part radio documentary series NDNs on the Airwaves focused on the current history of native radio in Canada (launched in February 2016).

Janet Roger’s residency session is made possible by the generous support of Sunrise Springs Spa Resort in partnership with 赌博游戏下载.

Meghann O’Brien

Meghann O’Brien

March 7–May 1, 2018

Wayne Nez Gaussoin

February 19–April 18, 2018

Wayne Nez Gaussoin

Wayne Nez Gaussoin

Wayne Nez Gaussoin (Navajo/Picuris Pueblo), the youngest of three sons, of renown Jeweler Connie Tsosie Gaussoin. Following a family tradition, his mother and older brother David, have taught him basics of silversmithing. He has since taken courses at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, finished his Bachelor of Fine Arts at the Institute of American Indian Arts, and has currently completed a Master of Fine Arts with a Minor in Museum Studies from The University of New Mexico.

Marwin Begaye

March 15–April 12, 2018

Monte Yellow Bird, Sr.

March 24–April 26, 2018

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Black Pinto Horse is best known for Ledger Art or Warrior Art, a historic, transitional expression from the 1800’s demonstrated by Northern and Southern Plains tribes. As a child, he was first influenced by the family’s first black-and-white TV, drawing images of the Vietnam War.

An 赌博游戏下载 Alumni in the late 70’s High School program, he went on to attend NDSU, majoring in History Education and receiving his BFA from Minot State University. In addition to academic studies, Black Pinto Horse has invested over 35 years to youth and communities across the country from public art projects, classroom teaching, mentoring, and martial arts instruction.

In 2017, Black Pinto Horse traveled to Abu Dhabi, chosen as Master Artist at the Art Hub. He has won multiple awards at major markets such as Autry Museum in Los Angeles, Heard Museum in Phoenix, SWAIA in Santa Fe, and the Eiteljorg in Indianapolis. In August 2014, he was awarded the SWAIA Residency Fellowship in Santa Fe.

Ian Kuali’i

March 24–April 26, 2018

Kuali’i has created one-of-a-kind, site-specific art pieces for events and programs at Honor the Earth, WallTherapy, UrbanArt Biennale 2017, Universal Pictures, deYoung Museum, National Museum of Mexican Art, National Trust for Historic Preservation, and Friends of Miami Marine Stadium.

Orlando Dugi

January 8–March 8, 2018

Orlando Dugi

Orlando Dugi

Christa Cassano

Christa Cassano

Christa Cassano

Ghetto Klown, into a graphic novel, and has contributed political cartoons to the RESIST! Newsletter distributed at the Women’s March on Washington 2017 and the comix anthology A.P.B. (Artists against Police Brutality).

Micheal Two Bulls

January 15–February 17, 2018

Micheal Two Bulls

Micheal Two Bulls

Wade Patton

January 12–February 10, 2018

Wade Patton

Wade Patton

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November 6–December 6, 2017

Athena LaTocha

Athena LaTocha

Athena LaTocha


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Frank Buffalo Hyde

Frank Buffalo Hyde

Frank Buffalo Hyde

SKNDNS-Native Americans on Film, was purchased by The National Museum of the American Indian. Buffalo Hyde has shown internationally including a summer and fall 2012 exhibition of contemporary art in Russia and in galleries in Japan, Chicago, New York, and San Francisco. He has been an artist-in-residence and exhibited at the 赌博游戏下载 Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MoCNA) in Santa Fe and at the University of Virginia’s Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection. His most recent solo exhibition, I-Witness Culture
Jason Reed Brown

Jason Reed Brown

Jason Reed Brown

Wanesia Spry Misquadace

Wanesia Spry Misquadace

Wanesia Spry Misquadace

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October 4–November 4, 2017

Erica Lord

Erica Lord

Erica Lord

Erica Lord (Athabaskan) is an interdisciplinary artist who explores concepts and issues that exist within a contemporary Indigenous experience and how culture and identity are affected in a rapidly changing world. Lord draws on her experience of growing up between Alaska and Upper Michigan and her mixed race cultural identity drawn from her Athabaskan, Iñupiat, Finnish, Swedish, Japanese, and English descent. In order to address a multiple or mixed identity, Lord uses a variety of mediums to construct new, ambiguous, or challenging representations of race. Lord received her BA from Carleton College, and a MFA at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She has exhibited nationally and internationally, including the 赌博游戏下载 Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MoCNA) in Santa Fe, the Musée du Quai Branley in Paris, the National Gallery of Canada, and the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian.

Peter Williams

Peter Williams

Peter Williams

Peter Williams (Yup’ik) who was born and based in Alaska, strives to express and celebrate the oneness of all things, with emphasis on the human spiritual relationship with nature. He views this connection in his art as vital for healing the human soul along with the well-being of the planet. Williams smudges with Labrador Tea before a hunt, praying for safety and clean kills. He asks the animals for their lives before he shoots while giving them their last drink of water prior to skinning. Meat is a large part of his diet, a gift he shares with his community. The artist views these acts to honor the animals enabling their spirits to visit again. He has demonstrated the technique of skin sewing seal and sea otter fur by hand at Southeast Alaska Indian Cultural Center, Sheldon Jackson Museum, Alaska State Museum, and to Alaska Native youth. Each stitch binds the human world closer to the animal world.

The Guardian. His first runway show was at Brooklyn Fashion Week, 2016. Later that year, the New York Times 502 Bad Gateway
Ryan Feddersen

Ryan Feddersen

Ryan Feddersen

Ryan Feddersen (Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Okanogan and Arrow Lakes) is a Seattle-based artist who creates multi-layered environments and interactive sculptures alongside intimate studio work. Her art is tongue-in-cheek, with a pointed message by providing opportunities for a re-examination of shared histories through humor and fun, and hands-on engagement. Hypocrisies and injustices in contemporary American culture in regard to race, class, and gender—through a historical, cultural, and urban lens are often addressed in her work. Feddersen received a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Cornish College of the Arts in 2009, graduating Magna Cum Laude with concentrations in painting, print art, drawing, and sculpture. She has created large-scale interactive installations and site-specific pieces for regional museums and arts agencies including the Seattle Office of Arts and Culture, Tacoma Art Museum, MoPOP(EMP), The Henry Gallery, Spokane Arts, and the Missoula Art Museum.

September 1–30, 2017

Janice George

Janice George

Janice George

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Salish Blankets, Robes of Protection and Transformation, Symbols of Wealth with Willard Joseph and Leslie H. Tepper. For the last twelve years, the artist has been teaching her textile skills across Salish speaking territory. She attended Capilano University, British Columbia, the Institute of American Indian Arts, Santa Fe, and interned at the Canadian Museum of History, Quebec.

Leanne Campbell

Leanne Campbell

Leanne Campbell

Marlene Ann Nielsen

Marlene Ann Nielsen

Marlene Ann Nielsen

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March 30–April 28, 2017

Ka’ila Farrell-Smith

Ka’ila Farrell-Smith

Ka’ila Farrell-Smith

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Watch a short video segment from Oregon Public Broadcasting featuring Ka’ila Farrell-Smith.

Anthony Lovato

Anthony Lovato

Anthony Lovato

Anthony Lovato (Santo Domingo Pueblo) is the son of notable lapidary artist Mary Coriz Lovato and grandson of Santiago Leo Coriz. Lovato, fifth-generation Pueblo of Santo Domingo, employs unique tufa-cast and fabricated jewelry that bridges both traditional and contemporary styles. It also conveys great presence, while reflecting his family’s creative legacy as well as Santo Domingo’s religious heritage.

“I really come from a traditional jewelry family,” says Lovato. His mother, Mary, raised him and his four brothers to become accomplished silversmiths. Lovato also learned from his father, Sedelio F. Lovato, a metalworker who did both casting and inlay work. Most of his learning came from his grandfather, Santiago Leo Coriz, who was skilled in tufa-casting.

February 24–March 24, 2017

John Hagen

John Hagen

John Hagen (Aleut/Inupiaq) is a landscape photographer who lives in Haines, AK. His inspiration is people and place and the interaction between the two. As an Alaska Native born and raised outside his traditional homeland, he explores place and how it relates to identity.


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In his most recent work, Hagen has been seeking out inspirations for Indigenous art and designs in nature. The end result is abstract landscape photographs. Rather than focus on the sweeping Alaska landscape, Hagen may choose to photograph a single crack in the ice or the curves of a river—shapes that may have influenced his ancestors in their art or designs.

Craig Dan Goseyun, photograph by Rosalie Favell

Craig Dan Goseyun, photograph by Rosalie Favell

Craig Dan Goseyun

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January 19–February 17, 2017

Meghann O’Brien

Meghann O’Brien

Fritz Casuse

Fritz Casuse

Fritz Casuse (Navajo) is an award-winning jeweler known for his highly complex handcrafted masterpieces. He is also a sculptor and brings this expertise to his jewelry-making, creating highly dimensional and textured jewelry pieces that are fluid and full of movement. Casuse was inspired by his father who, as a carpenter and welder, was always creating things. He is inspired by the act of creation and is always experimenting in his art. His contemporary work is cutting-edge and truly challenges ideas of what Native American jewelry is. A graduate of the Institute of American Indian Arts, Casuse now teaches at the Poeh Arts Center in Pojoaque, New Mexico, educating a new generation of Native jewelers. He has taken home honors from many prestigious shows, including Best of Classification at Santa Fe Indian Market and Heard Museum Market. Originally from Twin Lakes, New Mexico, Casuse now lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

November 11–December 9, 2016

Demian DinéYazhi’

Demian DinéYazhi’

Demian DinéYazhi’ is a Portland-based transdisciplinary artist born to the clans Naasht’ézhí Tábąąhá (Zuni Clan Water’s Edge) and Tódích’íí’nii (Bitter Water) of the Diné (Navajo). His work is best understood through the lens of curatorial inquiry, zine production, street interventions, education, workshops, and art production. Demian’s artwork and writing is an evolving inquiry into Radical Indigenous Queer Feminist ideology and has been exhibited and published nationally and internationally. He received his BFA in Intermedia Arts from PNCA, where he received the Intermedia Department Award for his thesis exhibition “Bury My Art at Wounded Knee: Blood & Guts” in the Art School Industrial Complex. He is the founder and director of the artist/activist initiative, Radical Indigenous Survivance & Empowerment (RISE), which is dedicated to the education, perseverance, and evolution of Indigenous art and culture. DinéYazhi’ is the recipient of grants from Evergreen State College (2014), Portland Institute of Contemporary Art (PICA) (2014), and Art Matters Foundation (2015).

Cannupa Hanska Luger

Cannupa Hanska Luger

Liselotte Erdrich

Liselotte Erdrich

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Her birchbark pieces were exhibited at Plains Art Museum and at Lewis & Clark State Park, where she was an artist-in-residence. In addition to being a visual artist, Erdrich has written fiction, essays, and children’s books illustrated by Native artists Julie Buffalohead and Lisa Fifield. She has won numerous writing awards including International Reading Association Children’s Choice and Teachers’s Choice Awards and Carter G. Woodson Medal from the National Council on the Social Studies.

October 7–November 4, 2016

Erin Gingrich

Erin Gingrich

Erin Gingrich

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After graduating from Interior Distance Education of Alaska in 2008, Gingrich attended the University of Alaska Fairbanks from where she graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 2014 with concentration in Native art and painting. She now resides in Anchorage Alaska and where she continues to carve, paint, draw, and bead from her small home studio.

Nakkita Trimble

Nakkita Trimble

Nakkita Trimble

Nakkita Trimble, Nakkita Trimblehl waý, ii Algaxhl Gwilks-ḵ’alt’amtkwhl wam aluugigadiý. Ksim Ganada ńiiý, ii Gingolx wil ẃitgwiý. Nisga’ahl nooý, ii Tlingithl nigwoodiý. Rose (Gurney) hl wahl agwii-nits’iits’iý, ii Christopher Trimblehl wahl agwii-niye’eý.

Christopher’s mother, Ellen Jane Trimble, was a Tlingit Wolf. Nakkita Trimble states, “Through my ancestors I am re-connecting the Nisga’a and Tlingit marital and family ties. I am currently trying to find which village Ellen’s family came from. My family tree and connection to identity are the seeds of the work I create.”

September 2–September 30, 2016

Jason Garcia

Jason Garcia, photograph courtesy artist

Jason Garcia

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Garcia received his BFA from the University of New Mexico and MFA in Printmaking at the University of Wisconsin.

Gerry Quotskuyva

Gerry Quotskuyva, photograph courtesy artist

Gerry Quotskuyva



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In the Fall of 2009, Quotskuyva was commissioned by the Heard Museum to create ten Sunface Katsina sculptures that were presented as prizes at the Cancer Treatment Centers of American annual Tennis Championships in Surprise, AZ. He is currently working on a permanent collection for Xavier University in Cincinnati, OH, that consists of over fifty pieces reflecting the diversity of his sculptural styles.

September 5–October 7, 2016

Luke Parnell

Luke Parnell, photograph courtesy artist

Luke Parnell

March 23–April 25, 2016

Rory Wakemup

Rory Wakemup (Minnesota Chippewa Tribe) is a Master of Fine Arts graduate from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2015. He received his Master of Arts at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2014. He received his Bachelor of Fine Arts from the Institute of American Indian Arts Santa Fe New Mexico in 2010.

Wakemup is a multidisciplinary artist whose work turns the script of cultural appropriation on its head. He has morphed his experience in Indian ceremonies with his studio art practice and has become a conduit between conceptual ideas and the materials at hand. Wakemup enjoys playing with the grey areas of what is appropriate in today’s society. He was a co-founder of the Humble Experiment, Independent Student Gallery in Santa Fe, New Mexico and was on a panel for Native Underground, sponsored by the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture.

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Natalie Ball

Natalie Ball (Modoc and Klamath Tribes) was born and raised in Portland, Oregon. She has a BA in Ethnic Studies from the University of Oregon and she furthered her education in New Zealand at Massey University where she attained her MA in Maori Visual Arts. Ball currently resides with her three children on the Klamath Tribes’ former reservation.

February 19–March 18, 2016

Jonathan Thunder

Jonathan Thunder

Jonathan Thunder

Jonathan Thunder (Red Lake Ojibwe) is a painter and digital media artist currently residing in Duluth, Minnesota. He attended the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe and received a BFA in Visual Effects and Motion Graphics from the Art Institutes International Minnesota. His work has been featured in many state, regional, and national exhibitions, as well as in local and international publications.

Royce Manuel and Debbie Manuel

Royce Manuel ( Ak-Mierl Aw-Thum, Salt River Pima- Maricopa Indian Community) and Debbie Manuel, MSW (Diné).

Royce and Debbie Manuel

Royce and Debbie Manuel

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Royce, a 22-year Veteran Retired Firefighter, provides cultural presentations, art demonstrations and remains active throughout his community in Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community and throughout the state.

Together, the Manuels bridge art and science, using traditional knowledge about plants and animals, woodworking skills, and physics to create functional bows and arrows. An additional recent endeavor for the couple has been reviving a near-lost traditional Aw-Thum Kiaho (burden basket).

January 15–February 12, 2016

Joe Feddersen

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Joe’s work is represented in a number of books including Mixed Blessings by Lucy Lippard, Manifestations, by the Institute of American Indian Arts, Santa Fe, NM, and Changing Hands, Museum of Art Design, NY. A monogram Joe Feddersen/Vital Signs is part of the Jacob Lawrence book series from the University of Washington Press. Upon retirement he returned home to the reservation and now resides and works in Omak, WA, on the Colville Confederation Tribal Reservation.

Drew Michael

Drew Michael (Yup‘ik and Inupiaq) was born in Bethel, Alaska. He and his twin brother grew up in Eagle River, Alaska.

Michael enrolled in a carving class with Bob Shaw and Joe Senungetuk in 1997, during which he learned some of the basics of history, usage of tools, and wood working techniques. Shortly after, he took a job with the Alaska Native Heritage Center and was able to enroll in carving classes provided through the high school program. He also had the great opportunity of working with Kathleen Carlo early in his career. She helped him expand his use of tools and break out of the traditional style of mask making.

While he was learning and practicing his craft, he was searching for his own style and niche in the carving world by studying the masters. He looked for the craftsmanship displayed in the final pieces and spent many hours looking at a piece and thinking about the design and process it took to create the piece. He took those thoughts and applied them to his own work, learning how to manipulate his work into what it is today through the process of trial and error.

November 6–December 5, 2015

Gerald Clarke Jr.

Gerald Clarke Jr. is a member of the Cahuilla Band of Indians located 40 miles southwest of Palm Springs, California. He currently lives on his family’s ranch on the reservation and has served as Vice Chairman on the Tribal Council in the past.

Gerald is currently the Visual Arts Department Chair of Idyllwild Arts Academy and teaches classes in Sculpture and Painting. Previously, Gerald served as an Assistant Professor of Art at East Central University in Ada, Oklahoma.


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James Luna

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October 1—October 30, 2015

Ed Archie NoiseCat


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NoiseCat Studios/House of Swasulayas is a professional sculpture studio located in Shelton, Washington. The studio specializes in monumental art pieces for corporate, private and tribal clients.

Dyani White Hawk

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August 28–September 25, 2015

Glenda Mckay

In 2006, Glenda McKay was invited to the Heard Museum Indian Market, where she won her first Ribbon. Her work has been exhibited in the Floral Journey exhibition at Autry National Center Museum in Los Angeles and the Burke Museum in Seattle. McKay has also received fellowships from Cook Inlet Tribal Council in Anchorage, Alaska, and the School for Advanced Research in Santa Fe.

Jonathan Loretto

His jewelry skills were passed down by his brother Philip Loretto, who in his own right is an accomplished jeweler with work in the Lourve, Paris. As a jeweler, Jonathan has worked for well-established companies such as Fairchild’s & Co., Nancy Brown, Marc Howard Goldsmith, and Bagley and Hotchkiss—and he also worked on Ralph Lauren’s concho belt collection. While largely self-taught as a claywork artist, Jonathan was inspired by his mother Snowflake Flower’s storytellers and figurines to create a new form of storytellers—kinetic clay bobbleheads.

Lara Evans

Lara Evans

(Cherokee)

Associate Dean
Academics
P (505) 424-2389
E levans@iaia.edu

Biography

504 Gateway Time-out Now is the Time: Investigating Native Histories and Visions of the Future (2017) and War Department: Selections from MoCNA’s Permanent Collection (2015–2016).

Angelica Gallegos

Angelica Gallegos

Administrative Assistant
Artist-in-Residence Program
P (505) 424-5713
E agallegos@iaia.edu

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